Jott-Egor-Twitter Mashup

jott-mashup.jpg

This one is for my Twitter Friends. I’ve found a way to do hands-free Tweets. A few weeks ago, Drew McLellan blogged about Jott.com, a service that translates messages left using your cellphone into e-mails to people in your contact list.  At the time, I was getting all infatuated with Twitter and thought it would be cool to be able to Jott a message to my Twitter account. The missing link (unless you can program this stuff yourself) is a tool call egorcast which is specifically designed to allow you to Jott a message to Twitter, as well as Jaiku (if you live in that part of the world) and your WordPress blog.

This allows you to Twitter from anywhere that has cellphone access but browser access is either not available or not advisable (like driving into work). Set up your Jott and Twitter accounts first (if you don’t have them already). Then go to egorcast and connect it all together.

Have fun!

CBS, Sling & SecondLife???

In case you haven’t see this, CBS will be joined by Sling Media and SecondLife in a presentation at CES today.  I’ll update the post after the details are out.

UPDATE:  So the keynote is over and here’s the skinny.  For the past year of so, we’ve all been talking about “The New Media”,  “Generation C(ontent)”,  “Web twodotwhatever” and so on.  We’ve also been saying that traditional media “doesn’t get it” or is no longer relevant. 

Apparently good old CBS isn’t going to go away quitely.  Instead, they have spent the last year developing lots of new partnerships with everyone from social networking sites for lesbians to SecondLife where a virtual replica of the Starship Enterprise (CBS property) will be made available to residents.  Perhaps that’s a bit over the top, but this is afterall the age of “Individual and Interactive”.  There is no niche too small (right longtailers?) and we all want to play a starring role.

In his keynote address, CBS President and CEO Leslie Moonves showed off quite a few of his new friends to demonstrate that CBS “gets it”.

“The symbiotic relationship (between online and television content) will only tighten,” Moonves said. “What’s a big media company like us to do? We’re embracing it big time. We’re doing just about everything we can to see what’s going to work now and in the future.” That often means bringing in people outside CBS to do so, he said.

The partnership with Sling media involves Sling’s latest technology called Clip + Sling. It allows users to clip content from live or recorded TV and share it with anyone, including non-Slingbox owners. The clip can be sent in an e-mail that plays the video from a hosted portal.   It’s not exactly YouTube, so to cover all the bases, CBS also has a joint venture with Google’s latest toy in the form of a contest in which users submit 15-second videos to YouTube about anything they’d like.  The highest-rated video will be broadcast on CBS during this year’s Superbowl.

The message from Moonves is that “there is no such thing as old media and new media.  There’s just media.” Is this kind of media mash-up going to save the traditional guys from extinction?   What do you think?  While you ponder that, I think I’ll head over the the StarTrek sim in SecondLife.  I hear there’s a helluva dance party going on in the shuttle craft bay 🙂

Another Nail in the DVD Coffin???

A new Video on Demand deal between Comcast and Disney gives Comcast the ability to use some ABC shows for its massive VOD effort as well as broadband. But more importantly, the far-reaching agreement may become the model on which the new media world soon operates.

According to BusinessWeek, Comcast is expected to announce a new TV portal, code-named C-TV, that Disney will help promote through the use of film and TV clips that Comcast would use online. Down the road, the two companies may work more closely together to provide ABC, Disney Channel, and other kinds of programs for the portal as well, according to sources at both companies. But that’s just the start of the relationship…

Disney is expected to help Comcast test the notion of showing movies on demand at the same time the movies are available in DVD stores—effectively shortening the lag time before cable gets access to those films. It’s a development certain to drive major DVD retailers like Wal-Mart (WMT) nuts. “The deal is all about Comcast wedging itself into an online content company and using Disney as a partner to get there,” says UBS analyst Aryeh Bourkoff, who follows both companies.

Both companies have been aggressively trying to improve their image. Disney wants to be seen as more agile and an adopter of new technologies. Comcast needs to update its offerings to remain competitive with Telcos and new media outlets like MySpace. This deal accomplishes both objectives by giving Comcast access to Disney programming for its On Demand service. Disney gets access to more than 24 million Comcast TV subscribers and another 11 million high-speed Internet customers. Disney intends to sell ads for most of its shows. Where will the partnership go from here?  The BusinesWeek article says:

Disney has told Comcast it is willing to participate in a test in two markets, in which it would offer movies on demand three or four months after the movies show up in movie theaters—the same time DVDs are shipped to retailers such as Wal-Mart. Disney has already ruffled feathers among retailers like Wal-Mart and Target (TGT) by offering its movies on Apple’s iTunes site at prices that the large retailers believe are below their wholesale price (see BusinessWeek, 9/11/06, “The Empire Strikes Back”). But this could send folks to Comcast instead of Wal-Mart to buy the DVDs. For Iger, who has said he wants to experiment with narrowing the “windows,” it is a toe in the water.

For Comcast, Disney presents a formidable ally in taking on telcos and others in the battle to deliver movies and TV shows over the Internet. C-TV, the new TV portal due in the coming weeks, is expected to help consumers organize their videos—be they consumer-generated or shows that they have streamed or downloaded from other sites. But down the road, Comcast wants to make episodes of TV shows available online, giving it the ability to offer custom-made channels for shows like Lost or Desperate Housewives. ABC hasn’t agreed to that, but the lines of communication are open since both companies are eager to experiment in the broadband world, according to sources with knowledge of the deal.

Given the extremely tense relationship these two have had in recent years, the new spirit of cooperation is remarkable but also very good for both companies.  In the end it may mean profound changes in how media is bought and consumed and that will be disruptive to retailers who rely on DVD content as a traffic driver.

Google Shares Ad Wealth with Videographers

Google has begun sharing advertising revenue with the makers of a popular video clip. From the article:

“[This] is a groundbreaking deal that could drive up the costs of competing in the fledgling video-sharing sector. The search company has agreed to turn over most advertising revenue generated by the latest video from Fritz Grobe and Stephen Voltz, creators of ‘The Diet Coke & Mentos Experiment,’ according to Peter Chane, a senior product manager for Google Video.”

Bud.tv – Budweiser To Launch Social Video Entertainment Network (bud tube)

Bud Tv225Karl Long over at Experience Curve has an excellent piece on the Launch of Bud.TV, a major effort by Budweiser to capitalize on the shift away from traditional Television to digital channels which foster social interaction.  Bud commercials have long been a huge draw (singing frogs, Bud Bowl, etc).  With Bud.TV they are really extending the entertainment component of their brand.

From the piece:

“In another nail in the coffin of network television Anheuser-Busch has just announced it will be launching Bud.tv in February ‘07. Bud.tv will be an online entertainment channel that will blend professionally produced content, news, sports and consumer generated content.”

“Bud.TV will engage contemporary adult consumers with a wide array of entertainment options in branded and original proprietary content including new humorous webisodes, sporting events, consumer-generated content, field news reports, celebrity interviews, music downloads and comedian vignettes. The first-of-its-kind initiative is slated to launch in February 2007, and more content providers will be announced in the coming months.”

Innovation and the T-Shirt

Phillips has always been an innovator in lighting and displays. Now they bring that innovative approach to the lowly T-shirt with their Lumalive light emiting textiles. Phillips is currently targeting promotional companies, “looking for new, high-impact media.” Hopefully, the technology will remain costly enough to keep it out of the mainstream novelty T-shirt channel as the visual noise could be overwhelming.

While the textile innovation is interesting, I think the bigger story is that Phillips has discovered YouTube as a great medium for sharing their innovation work. I had heard about this technology, but it wasn’t until I saw the video that I had an appreciation for what it could do. Have half a million people opted in to learn about your company’s innovations?

Here’s the link to the YouTube LumaLive video.

Here’s a link to more Phillips YouTube demonstrations.

Google Planning On Using Your PC to Listen In On You, Serve You Ads

If the NSA eavesdropping weren’t enought, The Register is now reporting that Google is planning to use your PC’s built-in microphone to monitor what you’re watching on TV in the background. With that information, they’re going to serve you contextual ads on your browser or desktop (we don’t know which) to match the show you’re viewing. Since Google’s all for storing information about you, we don’t doubt that if they do implement this program, they’re going to store all recordings collected for some later project.

I agree with the article that this is going to raise some very serious privacy issues.

Google says that its fingerprinting technology makes it impossible for the company (or anyone else) to eavesdrop on other sounds in the room, such as personal conversations, because the conversion to a fingerprint is made on the PC, and a fingerprint can’t be reversed, as it’s only an identity.But we should think that “spyware” might take on an extra meaning if someone less scrupulous decided on a similar piece of software.